Fancy new level-selection screen

Nelly's Rooftop Garden

Awards

Give this entry an award

Scores

Ratings (show detail)

Overall: 4.4
Fun: 4.4
Production: 4.2
Innovation: 4.6

Respondents: 29

Files

File Size Uploader Date
sc10.pngfinal
Fancy new level-selection screen
221.2 KB alex 2006/05/01 02:09
nelly-1.0.tar.gzfinal
Post-competition revised special edition
504.5 KB alex 2006/05/01 01:58
sc9.png
Scene from one of the later levels
330.6 KB alex 2006/04/01 22:56
rushed-0.3.tar.gzfinal
Final submit
478.7 KB alex 2006/04/01 22:55
sc7.png
Final game screenshot
471.1 KB alex 2006/04/01 19:52
sc8.png
Title screen
169.5 KB alex 2006/04/01 19:51
rushed-0.2.tar.gzfinal
Beta
477.3 KB alex 2006/04/01 19:51
rushed-0.1.tar.gz
working demo, not really a game yet
153.4 KB alex 2006/03/31 16:19
sc6.png
interfaced
175.0 KB alex 2006/03/31 16:02
rushed.tar.gz
Test particle and interaction
11.9 KB alex 2006/03/29 14:46
sc5.png
interactivity
64.5 KB alex 2006/03/29 14:45
sc4.png
perpetual
55.7 KB alex 2006/03/27 13:03
sc3.png
condensation
59.0 KB alex 2006/03/26 13:47
sc2.png
steamy particles with collision
46.8 KB alex 2006/03/26 06:25
sc1.png
steamy particles
35.2 KB alex 2006/03/26 02:55

Diary Entries

Post-competition revised special edition

Nelly has had a couple of bugs fixed, some UI tweaks to make it a bit more mouse-friendly and, by popular demand, a level-selection screen. You can download the update here nelly-1.0.tar.gz or admire her new permanent web page: http://www.partiallydisassembled.net/nelly.

I had lotsa fun during the competition, so many thanks to you all and Richard especially for making it all work. I wrote a little more introspection stuff in my blog.

See you all in six months!

Add a comment

Really, really done.

You get value for money:

  • 15 (mostly) challenging levels
  • Free-play "sandpit" to nourish your creativity
  • Integrated level designer to challenge friends, family and strangers
  • Detailed subplot and deep metaphorical insight into the nature of humanity (must read between lines and have awful lot of imagination).

Don't wait, start steaming today!

Hurrah.

8 comments

A game emergeth!

Most of Friday was coding and drawing, then 5 hours sleep, then 22 hours straight coding since then until now. But it paid off! I honestly didn't think I'd get a playable game out of this idea, but I did, and you can play it.

There are only 8 levels so far, plus the sandbox free-for-all, I will see how many more levels I can add before the deadline.

4 comments

end in sight

Lots of work done today but not so much to show for it. Most of it was spent rearranging code, refactoring and optimising. Moving the collision, response, game-logic and drawing code all into separate components not only saves my sanity, it boosts framerate from 10fps to around 20 for a typical scenario.

A more robust user interface is in place now, so selecting a tool, dragging & rotating it and having all the collision models update is working pretty solidly. Getting the rest of the tools in should be a snap. The screenshot here shows the level editor (the blue collision boundaries are editable).

Also in the screenshot is a flower, somewhat droopy.. indicating it's not receiving quite enough water.

Still a mammoth amount of work to be done.. hopefully a tad under 24 hours' worth :-)

3 comments

interactivity

Whee.. now we can place objects and move them around and see how the steam and water react. Don't worry, the gaminess is not too far away now!

Have a play: rushed.tar.gz (requires pygame & pyopengl). Click to place an object, click&drag to reposition it, and click and drag the rotation handles (shown below) to rotate it. Easy eh?

5 comments

speedier

The collision code did not scale at all well to dealing with lots of collision objects, so wrote a uniform grid check on top of it. Debugging this took a lot longer than expected. Still will need tweaking, depending on the game scenarios, but seems to handle about 1000 particles with any number of colliders now at around 20 fps. Anyone know a good Python profiler? Also added mouse-picking code.

Add a comment

perpetual

Steam rises, hits a cold surface and condenses, forming a water droplet which runs along the surface until it falls, bounces, and hits the hot plate, vaporising instantly into steam, which rises... Conservation of energy! perpetual

5 comments

condensation

Steam now collides and diverts around polygons, causing condensation to form and water droplets to run down the polygon and off the screen.

2 comments

steamy particles

Have made suitably beatiful steam, but no ideas for a game...

4 comments